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Any thoughts on Apple's switch to USB-C cable charger?

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(@tiago)
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Joined: 11 months ago
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For a while, there was a rumor about Apple switching from its lightning connector to the popular USB-C and yesterday Bloomberg finally confirmed that the iPhone 15 that's about to be released will come with a USB-C charging port. Now some people think this will defeat the uniqueness of iPhones which for a long time has been in a world of its own. You know because it's been like 'iPhone and others'. However, I think it is brilliant because one can now just have one charger for MacBook and iPhone and we can finally start reducing cable waste that ends up in landfills.  

What do y'all think about this?

This topic was modified 10 months ago by Tiago

   
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 Rain
(@rain)
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Brilliant indeed though I read that this was not Apple's decision. The European Union Regulation forced their hands.

Honestly, we don't talk about e-waste enough. Whilst these tech companies think their yearly dump of newer models is a smart and visionary move, they ignore the fact that the rapid pace of technological advancement has led to shorter product lifecycles, a development that's leading to a substantial increase in electronic waste generation. More than that is the toxicity of these electronic devices which often contain hazardous substances such as lead, mercury, polyvinyl chloride etc. When improperly disposed of or recycled, these substances can leach into the soil and water, posing serious health risks to humans and wildlife.

 


   
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 Stan
(@stan)
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It is a positive development, though not entirely sustainable. The fact remains that tech companies like Apple continue to deplete valuable resources. When e-waste is not recycled or recovered properly, valuable resources and precious metals like gold, silver, and palladium go to waste, leading to increased mining activities and depletion of natural resources.   


   
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